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Racquet Stringing


The Richmond Hill Lawn Tennis Club and Magic Stringing are working together to provide members with best price and service when it comes to racquet stringing. Our fully certified Master Racquet Technician (MRT), Matthew Collura will work with you to find the best string for your game. We have a wide selection to choose from and we promise quick turnaround. 

Racquets can be dropped off with a monitor on duty or directly with Matthew

Contact Matthew at www.magicstringing.com or call (647) 606-3521




Stringing Guide

Why should Magic Stringing service my racquet?

We at Magic Stringing are constantly looking for the newest, most consistent way to string a racquet. We are all avid tennis players in Richmond Hill. Everyone at Magic Stringing are Master Racquet Technicians (MRT) certified by the USRSA. Anyone can string a racquet, we have taken an exhaustive test to show that we are qualified to service your racquet. At Magic Stringing, nobody but a certified MRT will touch your racquet.  We are also proud to announce that we are the only MRT's in Richmond Hill

What is a Master Racquet Technician (MRT)?

MRT is the highest certification given by the USRSA. There are only several hundred MRTs in the world. We at Magic Stringing have passed all aspects of the MRT test and are currently the only MRTs in Richmond Hill

How do I know if my racquet needs restringing?

Check whether any of the strings have frayed. A frayed string will be close to breaking.

A loss in string tension is another reason to consider restringing. A loss in tension will reduce the amount of control and power you are able to generate which will affect the performance of the racket.

Signs your strings have lost tension:

Your racquet is beginning to feel 'dead' or lifeless

You are having to swing harder to get the ball to go deeper

You make good contact with the ball but aren’t getting as many solid contacts

The sound has changed when making contact with the ball

How often should I have my tennis racquet restrung?

Magic Stringing recommends:

1. Have your racquet restrung after every 40 hours of play or 25 hours for polyester string

2. Have your racquet restrung the amount you play in a week in a year

    Example: if you play 3 times a week, have your racquet strung 3 times a year

It is worth noting that different types of string lose tension at different rates. A polyester string such as Luxilon Big Banger Original will lose tension faster than a synthetic gut string such as Head Synthetic Gut PPS. Your style of play will also affect the lifespan of your strings.

What types of tennis strings are there and what makes them different?

Natural Gut: The Rolls Royce of tennis strings, best of the best, top of the line tension maintenance and feel. Most common among pro players and club level players, downsides include high price and being weather sensitive.  

 

Multifilament: Synthetic Gut-Multifilament is a coreless string with multiple synthetic fibers twisted together similar to natural gut. Advantages include increased playability, comfort, power and feel over a monofilament string. Ideal for a player with arm issues and looking for a more forgiving comfortable string

Synthetic Gut: The most popular synthetic on the market, they derive durability and tension retention properties from their solid center cores. An outer wrap of smaller filaments or fibers assist in retaining tension and protect the core from small nicks and abrasions. The number & construction of wrapped filaments, diameters, and blends vary from string to string.

Polyester: Offer players increased durability over synthetic gut and Mono/Multifilament strings. Popular among hard hitters who break strings often noted for giving a dead feel and being very stiff for some, most common among tournament players and pros. Kevlar falls into this category as well. Polyesters provide the most amount of spin of any type of string



"I love the winning, I can take the losing, but most of all, I love to play". Boris Becker


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